The Ultimate Halloween Hangover Cure

art, Theatre Business

…Is The Immortal Jellyfish!

photo (1)

90% water, 5% comedy, 5% wonder-drama, this stuff will have you up and sounding intelligent to friends and relations faster than scrambled embryos and microwaved fat cells!

…Graphic.

Our next sci-fi rom-dram hits The Shop at Fort Fringe this afternoon at 1:00pm! Be there by 12:45 to get solid seats… they don’t let folks in late!

The address is 607 New York Ave NW. Tickets are $15 with a Fringe button, or $20 without. If you hate cash purchases, you can buy tickets online anytime before [EDIT:]11:00am at https://www.capitalfringe.org/fallfringe-2013/shows/265-the-immortal-jellyfish

We look forward to seeing you all there!

B: Bloom

art, Theatre Business, Theatrical Process

In preparation for The Immortal Jellyfish at the Capital Fringe, The Jellyfish alphabet continues!

Bloom:

Drifters-in-the-sea: salps bloom off the coast of New Zealand. Credit: Seacology

Drifters-in-the-sea: salps bloom off the coast of New Zealand. Credit: Seacology

A flock of seagulls.  A bunch of bananas.  A parliament of rooks.

Groups of animals have curious names.  Some make a pack, some a pride, but Jellyfish bloom.   Like a cherry blossom festival, but with carnivorous, occasionally immortal, hydrozoans.

While a flock or a bunch might contain some tens of members, jellyfish blooms number in the thousands and millions.

To be fair, jellyfish are much smaller than other species, and blooms form only on a seasonal basis.

As discussed in the Anatomy post, jellyfish are more stomach than brain.  Some contend that jellyfish lack the sentience to intentional cluster into groups, so the size of blooms depends on water temperature, salinity of water, and ocean currents.   Because jellyfish are more adaptable to salinity and temperature than many of their competitors and predators, the sizes of their blooms may only grow larger, season by season.

Tomorrow’s post will be on C: Cytosine.

For more on The Immortal Jellyfish premiering as part of the FallFRINGE, check out our show page!

Thanks for reading!

-K

A: Anatomy

art, Theatre Business, Theatrical Process

A: Anatomy

What is the anatomy of an immortal jellyfish?

As a multi-stage organism, the jellyfish’s anatomy changes through its life cycle.
Beginning as a polyp, the immortal jellyfish is formed as a polyp in a colony of such forms, called hydroids. These hydroids have stolons to connect them to their resident surface, and upright branches which bloom medusa buds, which eventually are released from the main colony.
The immortal jellyfish’s medusa form can reach an even 4.5 millimeter diameter, making a circular bell shape. This bell is made of a jelly, or mesoglea, covered by two layers of epidermis (like a peanut-butter jelly sandwich, minus the peanut butter). This mesoglea is somewhat thicker at its topmost part, and replaces a respiratory system in that the ‘skin’ of the jellyfish is thin enough for diffusion to deliver oxygen to the body. Also contained in the skin of the jellyfish is its nervous system, a kind of ‘nerve-net’ starting at the ‘rophalial lappet,’ the ring around the base of the jellyfish’s bell. This jelly-skin encapsulates a bright red, cross-shaped organ called a manubrium. The manubrium is a mixture of stomach and mouth, where a stalk protruding from the bell’s interior dangles down to a mouth at its base. The mouth opens into a gastrovascular cavity, which digests nutrients for the rest of the body. The smaller renditions of this creature have but eight tentacles, whereas the larger, older specimens have ten times that number.